Treating A Contusion To The Eye

Overview Of A Black Eye

  • A black eye is a contusion that surrounds the eye. When an item strikes the eye, the pressure of the impact damages delicate blood vessels.
  • Blood gathers underneath the skin, and causes black or blue bruising around the eye sockets and eyelids.
  • Because the skin around the eye is fairly thin, the blue or black color of a bruised eye might appear blacker and more intense than bruises on other parts of the body.
  • The cause of the injury is generally a blunt item — a hammer, a baseball, a rock or a piece of wood — and the most common area of injury is the home.

Prevention Of A Black Eye

A black eye is a contusion that surrounds the eye. When an item strikes the eye, the pressure of the impact damages delicate blood vessels.

A black eye is a contusion that surrounds the eye. When an item strikes the eye, the pressure of the impact damages delicate blood vessels.

Almost all eye injuries can be avoided. To reduce your possibility of eye injuries:

  • Use proper safety eye wear at work. Research has shown that face shields, safety glasses, and other defensive eye wear can decrease the threat of on-the-job eye injuries.
  • If you are a sports person, ask a qualified optometrist or optician for help in picking safety glasses that is suitable for your sport. Basketball and baseball cause the largest amount of eye injuries. When a basketball or baseball hits the eye, there is a possibility of a more severe trauma, including ruptures to the eye socket.
  • Always wear your seat belt when you are in the car. Seat belts help to shield your eyes, upper body and facial bones from hitting the dashboard.

Treatment Of A Black Eye

  • If you have a black eye, place cold ice packs (such as a cool, moist cloth) to the wounded eye for at least 20 minutes straight after your injury to help decrease discomfort, inflammation and bruising.

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